• Tools Used with Students 

    This is a tool to help us communicate when we experience conflict with someone.  We start with positive things about the rela

    This is a tool to help us communicate when we experience conflict with someone.  We start with positive things about the relationship, then slip in the "meat" of what is upsetting us using an "I" message.  Then we end on a positive note.

    Anxiety is the uneasiness, worry or tension we feel when we expect a real or perceived threat to our wellbeing. Thoughts beco

    Anxiety is the uneasiness, worry or tension we feel when we expect a real or perceived threat to our wellbeing. Thoughts become focused on bad or undesirable outcomes.

     

    Emotions

     

    Helping students learn to turn negative self-talk into positive self-talk is important to helping them to build self-esteem a

    Helping students learn to turn negative self-talk into positive self-talk is important to helping them to build self-esteem and overcome adversity.

     

    Anger is considered a secondary emotion. When we learn to identify the emotion behind our anger “mask” we can more readily pr

    Anger is considered a secondary emotion. When we learn to identify the emotion behind our anger “mask” we can more readily problem solve and express our needs.

     

  • Coping toolbox

    By Alysha Tagert
     
    One step I often suggest is for the person to assemble a coping tool box, which is an actual container filled with items that can help them soothe themselves in a time of panic or anxiety so they can practice mindfulness. For those for whom calming down doesn’t come naturally or who have had unique experiences that have caused them to require more effort to relax, these items can be lifesavers.
     
    ► Something that provides proprioceptive (the body's awareness of itself and its limbs) support, such as a weighted cushion, vest, or stuffed animal;
     
    ► An item to squeeze and keep their hands occupied like a stress ball or fidget spinner;
     
    ► Items to support breathing and relaxation such as a bottle of bubbles or a pinwheel;
     
    ► Olfactory sensory support, aka something that smells good like a calming essential oil spray;
     
    ► Something that requires movement like a book of yoga poses or a jump rope;
     
    ► A favorite playlist of music and noise-canceling headphones;
     
    ► An item for oral motor sensory support like sugar free chewing gum;
     
    ► Something that requires thought or concentration like a puzzle or reading book;
     
    ► And something visually soothing such as an hourglass or even an eye mask to block everything out so they can concentrate on their calming efforts.